3 licensing options for migrating to Microsoft Azure from Windows Server 2003

Win2k3Where will your organization go when Microsoft ends support for Windows Server 2003? Many organizations are formulating an answer to that question right now, preparing to meet the July 14, 2015 deadline. The myriad licensing models, program options, and cost scenarios for a Win2k3 migration make it a daunting task involving multiple decision points.

The top three options for migration are Windows Server 2012, Office 365, and Microsoft Azure, which will be the focus of this post.

Microsoft Azure is an option that can be implemented as an alternative to or in conjunction with an on-premises migration to Windows Server 2012. Azure infrastructure as a service (IaaS) provides organizations with a flexible cloud computing platform to build, deploy, and manage applications in a predictable operational expense model based on consumption. Microsoft Azure enables organizations to make an initial monetary commitment based on anticipated usage and future growth.

The most cost effective means to procure and manage Azure is through the Enterprise Agreement (EA) program. Here are three options for organizations looking to procure Azure under an EA model. (more…)

Migrating to Windows Server 2012 after the retirement of Win2k3? Read this first.

Win2k3Organizations should be starting to plan their move off of Windows Server 2003 in anticipation of its end of support on July 14, 2015. As they evaluate their options, a key decision will be identifying the migration destination for applications and workloads.

Microsoft has three target migration destinations: Windows Server 2012, Microsoft Azure, and Office 365. Each target destination will have various licensing implications and costs that need to be examined as part of the overall migration process.

We’ll cover all of these options in a three-part series on licensing considerations for Windows Server 2003 migrations, starting now with Windows Server 2012 — a logical choice if you’re looking to simply upgrade your systems. Read on to learn more about the Windows Server 2012 migration option, including its virtual environment rights and other key licensing considerations. (more…)

4 key insights into an organization’s IT asset management

ITAMSHI hosted a two-day IT Asset Management (ITAM) Summit in New Jersey last week, attracting 102 IT and procurement executives from 77 companies, ranging in size from less than $500 million in revenue to more than $50 billion. Having joined SHI just six months ago after holding CFO roles at both public and private companies, it has been interesting to learn so much about the challenges organizations have keeping track of their hardware and software assets and what we can do to help them.

These challenges are a concern not only to IT and procurement heads, but to those who manage internal controls and seek to optimize return on investment as well, such as CFOs, risk managers, and internal audit heads. When you consider how difficult it can be to control cloud and SaaS-based app usage and company data, the situation gets even worse. It’s no wonder that most of these leaders are losing sleep over ITAM issues.

To get a sense of the attending organizations’ approach to ITAM, we asked our audience to respond to a series of statements about asset management, risk, software audits, the cloud, and control over IT. Here are just a few of the things we learned: (more…)

5 mobile content management solutions to keep your data safe

locked mobile phonePhones and tablets have become ubiquitous workplace tools. As such, employees demand access to all the content they need to do their job wherever they might be. And while that’s good for productivity, it can be trouble for security.

If your organization is like most, you have an on-premises solution for content management, but might not have a system in place for when the data is accessed from a mobile device. And if your organization fails to offer adequate access, workers turn to consumer sync and share services — one in five use these services to store and share corporate documents in the cloud, according to a recent Forrester survey. While these solutions are convenient, they lie outside of IT control and expose companies to a number of data security threats.

Five years ago conversations revolved around mobile device management (MDM) as organizations equipped their employees with smartphones and tablets. Now it’s time to talk about mobile content management (MCM) and how to secure corporate data accessed from those devices.

Some organizations might have MCM as part of their MDM solution but aren’t using it. Others have no MCM, and their IT departments are forced to play catch up on data security threats. If you haven’t yet implemented an MCM solution, it’s time to assess your needs and see how they match up to some of the top enterprise-grade options available. (more…)

3 questions to help you find the best enterprise content collaboration solution

Cloud-On-Multiple-DevicesThe storage wars have been a popular topic of late. Whether it’s Microsoft and Google competing with Amazon Web Services’ ever-plummeting prices, or how economies of scale affect a player like Box, these stories often focus myopically on the storage component of the vendors and ignore the more important story: what the different offerings actually enable users and businesses to do with the content once it’s stored in a given system.

Every organization has its own needs and requirements when it comes to content. And businesses are increasingly taking a best-of-breed approach to their IT ecosystem; gone are the days when companies would buy all of their software, hardware, and services from a single vendor. With the rise in adoption of Office 365, Microsoft’s cloud-based productivity suite, many organizations are looking for complementary content solutions to expand their administrative controls and reporting of content, cross-platform usability, secure external collaboration, and BYOD mobile access.

How do you decide the right approach for your organization? Here are three questions to consider: (more…)

How to prepare for the end of Windows Server 2003

Win2k3After a long and productive life, Windows Server 2003 will soon be retired. Effective July 14, 2015, Microsoft will no longer provide hot fixes, security patches, and updates for Win2k3 and its millions of users.

If we learned anything from Microsoft’s discontinued support for Windows XP in 2014, it’s that organizations should be preparing now. A Windows Server 2003 migration will require your organization to coordinate technical, strategic, and business decisions affecting the backbone of your network software, and failure to migrate before the deadline could threaten your network security and regulatory compliance.

To help you get started — or to add to your already-growing checklist — here are six areas organizations will need to investigate before migrating off of Windows Server 2003: (more…)

3 key takeaways from the latest update to Microsoft’s MPSA

update to MPSAMicrosoft is weaving Software Assurance (SA) into its Microsoft Products and Services Agreement (MPSA), effective Sept. 1. This is one of several changes rolled out for MPSA that shed light on Microsoft’s direction for the program and make MPSA more attractive.

The addition of SA comes on the heels of Microsoft’s announcement that it’s retiring its Select Plus program, making MSPA a viable alternative for Select Plus now that it includes SA.

To put it simply, MPSA makes it easier for businesses of all sizes to understand the terms and conditions of their agreement, purchase new products, and receive Microsoft support. The addition of SA now allows for upgrades and support under these licenses as well.

Here’s what current and future customers need to know about the addition of SA to MPSA: (more…)

How the retirement of Microsoft’s Select Plus volume licensing program will affect you

Microsoft Products and Services Agreement (MPSA)

Broader availability of MPSA is coming this fall.

Since its inception in October 2008, Select Plus has been the recommended transactional volume licensing program for medium-to-large organizations looking to procure Microsoft products and services. But with the introduction of cloud services, such as Office 365, and other new programs, licensing models continued to grow more complex and gain more complicated program terms. For that reason, Microsoft introduced its new volume licensing program vehicle, Microsoft Product and Services Agreement (MPSA).

Now, with a broader release of MPSA — including the availability of Software Assurance (SA) — scheduled for September 2014 and worldwide availability planned for July 2015, Microsoft announced it is retiring Select Plus.

The Select Plus licensing program will be phased out in two stages: (more…)

The 5 values that determine your product audit risk

In my first post in the calculating product audit risk (PAR) series, I discussed how organizations should have two different strategies for managing their overall software estate. For the set of products where the value to the business or the risk of non-compliance is high, we suggest a “manage the product” approach. For the rest of the software portfolio, we suggest a “manage the risk” approach. To help differentiate between these two segments of the overall estate, we introduced the PAR value.

As a reminder, here is the PAR formula:

SHI-Product-Audit-Risk-equation

In general, the PAR value is meant to quantify the relative financial risk a product represents within the overall software portfolio. But before you can complete the math, you need to know where to find the factors that go into the equation. Here’s how: (more…)

What’s new in Backup Exec 2014

Symantec released Backup Exec 2014 last month, building on Backup Exec 2012’s advances in backup technology. But in a nod to users, the newest version also reinstated some key, long-standing features that were absent, and sorely missed, from Backup Exec 2012. The changes come on the heels of an extensive beta test conducted earlier this year, and demonstrate that Symantec takes customer feedback to heart. As a former backup administrator, I can tell you that backup admins are creatures of habit, and the last thing they want to do when things are working well is to change something. To that end, the removal of Job Monitor from Backup Exec 2012 and the version’s move from policy-focused backups to server-focused backups left some long-time Backup Exec administrators unhappy.

Symantec Backup Exec 2014But now Job Monitor is back in Backup Exec 2014, as is the ability to create multi-server backup policies. The look and feel of Backup Exec 2014 is similar to 2012, but the inclusion of this functionality cannot be understated. Administrators can once again see the status of all backup jobs from a single, convenient dashboard and can create policies containing multiple servers, which simplifies management. Upgrading from previous versions of Backup Exec is also easier than ever, with settings and policies from versions 12.5 and above maintained in Backup Exec 2014. (more…)