Sean Cassidy

Apple Business Development Manager

SeanCassidySean Cassidy specializes in mobility and software development. He joined SHI in 2008 and is now the Apple Business Development Manager. In his current role, he manages the SHI and Apple relationship and serves as a technical point of contact for SHI customers deploying Apple products into. for Apple integration procedures. Sean is an Apple Certified System Administrator (ACSA) and Apple Certified Technical Coordinator (ACTC). He also completed the Beginning iOS Bootcamp, and is well-versed in Objective-C and iPhone programming and app development. To get in touch with Sean, email him at Sean_Cassidy@SHI.com.

The biggest problem with AI is also its biggest opportunity

artificial intelligenceArtificial intelligence (AI) is better at spotting cancer than doctors, will be our future chauffer, and can even cook, if you don’t mind some experimental taste tests.

Much of this still sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, and that’s evidence of how far this technology has come in recent years. Businesses small and large are already contemplating how AI can support their goals, and some are already implementing it. There’s just one problem: Often, we have no idea how it works. (more…)

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A retail revolution: How EMV compliance is just part of the new retail

credit cardGoodbye, strips, and hello, chips. The shift of Europay, MasterCard, and Visa (EMV) liability occurs on Oct. 1, 2015, and could leave retailers on the hook for fraudulent credit card transactions.

If you haven’t heard about this liability changeover, you’re certainly not alone; a Wells Fargo/Gallup Small Business Index survey found that 49 percent of small business owners who accept POS credit card payments weren’t aware of the changing liability on Oct. 1.

What does it mean for your business and what can you do now?

The EMV liability change is just one step in a larger digital shift for retailers. Here’s how to plan for the EMV liability change and what to keep in mind about the broader actions needed to stay not just compliant, but competitive. (more…)

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Apple tips its hat to the enterprise with new VPP Credit

Shopping-Cart-With-Apps-InsideApple recently introduced mobile device management (MDM) for iOS as part of a new focus on enterprise markets. This is great news for both the companies that steered clear of iPhones and iPads until now and those that dove into iOS despite the enterprise limitations. One aspect of the move is especially welcome: Apple expanded its Volume Purchase Program (VPP) to create VPP Credit. Under the program, businesses can now purchase large volumes of apps in bulk through purchase orders (POs).

While iPads have been a mainstay of the workplace for years, companies struggled to manage work-related applications housed on each individual device. Initially, app purchases were conducted per user and individually charged back to the enterprise. Not only was this tedious, but the moment employees left an organization, they took all of the pre-installed, company-purchased apps with them. Organizations could lose out on hundreds of dollars per device. (more…)

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