5 consequences of poor BYOD management

Tablet-Eating-100-Dollar-BillBring your own device (BYOD) has slashed hardware and maintenance costs and fueled mobile productivity at companies large and small, and adoption is accelerating. Gartner estimates that by 2020, 45 percent of organizations will be all BYOD, while 40 percent will offer a mixed program, and only 15 percent won’t have any BYOD program in place.

But while BYOD can be a positive policy for numerous industries, it’s not going well for all organizations, especially those that have ignored the potential hazards associated with the policy.

Last year I discussed two unexpected consequences of BYOD, but since then the risks have expanded as available technology diversifies and new mobility demands arise. Here are five additional pitfalls of BYOD environments, and how organizations can avoid them: Continue Reading…

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Making sense of the software-defined data center

Software-defined data center (SDDC) is the latest buzzword in our industry. SDDC is the phrase used to refer to a data center in which all infrastructure is virtualized and delivered as a service. Management of the data center is automated by software — meaning the configuration of hardware is done through upper-level software systems. This allows new services to be turned on or off rapidly and existing services to grow and shrink as needed.

This is very different from traditional data centers in which the infrastructure is typically defined by hardware and devices that might require multiple IT administrators to configure them, which can greatly extend the time to market for these solutions.

There are three core components of the software-defined data center: network virtualization, server virtualization, and storage virtualization. There is also an overlying layer that has to support the business logic of SLAs and application performance demands of the organization.

The software-defined data center is considered by many to be the next step in the evolution of virtualization and cloud computing. What separates the software-defined data center from the cloud is its ability to support legacy enterprise applications as well as new services written with cloud in mind. Continue Reading…

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