How to get your maintenance renewals under control

If your organization always wants the latest and greatest products and most up-to-date support, chances are you buy your software and hardware maintenance from various manufacturers. The question is: How do you manage all of your purchases while ensuring you’re not overspending?

Renewal management can be complicated, involving a kaleidoscope of factors that can turn a simple process into a field full of potential land mines, including overspending and non-compliance. Here are some of the challenges IT organizations face while managing renewals and how to solve them.

1. Myriad buying programs. Every business unit has its own unique mix of hardware and software needs. When it comes to licensing Microsoft products, for example, some organizations excel with an Enterprise Agreement (EA) to license a particular number of seats at any time for any product. Other organizations utilize a Select Agreement to buy what they need when they need it. With other publishers, some parts of your organization might still rely on perpetual licenses while others need options like the subscription-based Adobe Creative Cloud. The range of potential ongoing agreements in any company is vast, and renewal dates are unlikely to align, creating the potential for under-licensing or budgetary “gotchas” if the various renewal dates aren’t closely tracked.

2. Multiple employees managing buying programs. Larger organizations have licenses with more manufacturers and for more products than any one person can manage alone. Of course splitting the workload, whether by division or manufacturer, reduces visibility into organization-wide renewal dates. Having employees manage licensing in a silo also limits potential cost-savings and cost-avoidance advantages for future licensing, as employees might not be aware that their combined purchases qualify them for the next level (price break) of cost-savings. Continue Reading…

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How to plan for renewal management

If your company has uncovered issues in underlicensing or overspending on software licenses — or even if you just want to be more proactive about IT needs – it’s time to rein in renewal management. Renewals can hit your company throughout the year from various vendors for everything from software maintenance to hardware leases. Even original equipment manufacturer (OEM) warranties eventually expire and create a need for a new warranty or new equipment.

The problem is that many companies fail to track these renewal or expiration dates. When the invoice for a renewal arrives without advance notice, they simply pay it based on their past agreements without stopping to think strategically about current and future needs. The issue is only exacerbated by the adoption of the cloud as perpetual licenses, which have no expiration date, get replaced by subscription and term licenses, which do expire.

By tracking expiration and renewal dates, as well as key dates internal to your company — such as when budgets are set — you can replace the reactive response to renewals with a more proactive stance that will not only potentially save your company money, but equip employees with the tools they need to do their jobs.

With advance warning of impending renewals, IT and procurement can take time to analyze and discuss any renewals, negotiate new agreements, or vet alternative vendors or solutions that better suit the state of your business. For example, your company might need to right size the number of commitments it has, reducing software maintenance to 800 desktops from 1,000.

Here are four points you should consider before renewing: Continue Reading…

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