Acrobat DC made easy: 5 questions about Adobe’s document manager answered

question mark guyIn April, Adobe released Acrobat Document Cloud (DC), its newest iteration of the document reading and editing application. Unlike Creative Cloud, which is only offered in a subscription-based model, Acrobat DC is available through either a perpetual license or as a subscription. Both licensing models can be purchased for every market segment, depending on an organization’s needs and IT environment.

Perpetual or subscription – what’s the difference? Organizations have struggled with this question and others since Acrobat DC was launched earlier this year, and we want to clear up the confusion about which options are available and other roadblocks users have come across. Here are five common questions we’re asked about Acrobat DC.  Continue Reading…

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Perpetual or subscription licensing for Autodesk? You can choose – for now.

jan-31-countdownIt’s the year of choice for Autodesk customers — organizations can either license Autodesk software through perpetual rights or Autodesk’s latest subscription licensing model, called Desktop Subscription. But not for long.

After Jan. 31, 2016, seats of Autodesk Point products, such as AutoCAD LT, will only be available through a term-based license plan called Desktop Subscription. While some suite products can still be licensed through perpetual rights after that date, standalone and network versions of popular Autodesk software will fully transition to Desktop Subscription. Customers currently licensed through perpetual agreements will see no change in their contract, but after Jan. 31, 2016, they’ll no longer have the option of purchasing new perpetual licenses.

So what does this deadline mean for existing customers? Is there an advantage to one option over the other? Should you change now or early next year? Here are a few considerations to ponder after you circle Jan. 31, 2016 on your calendar. Continue Reading…

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Microsoft User CAL pricing is changing. Here’s what you need to know.

Microsoft User CAL ChangesIn December 2012, Microsoft increased the cost of the User Client Access License (CAL) by 15 percent. Here on the SHI blog, we discussed the evolving nature of how organizations were accessing devices, both on premises and in the cloud, and Microsoft’s need to address this shift through an increase in the cost of User CALs.

Flash forward to 2015: Microsoft has announced an additional change in the cost of the User CAL licensing model. The decision behind the increase can be attributed to multiple factors, including increased adoption of multiple devices by information workers, and the subsequent ease of license management of User CALs versus Device CALs in multi-device scenarios. So we’re back on the blog to help you understand what this price adjustment means, and what some of your options are. Continue Reading…

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3 simple ways to take control of your Oracle licensing

three checksIt’s a simple fact: Software licensing is difficult to understand and manage. Even the savviest IT professional can struggle to comprehend certain complex language and terms in licensing agreements from the major software manufacturers. For example, companies report they often have difficulty understanding and complying with Oracle’s licensing rules, particularly when it comes to virtualization conflicts and upgrades that require additional licenses.

Case in point, one organization received a bill for millions of dollars, due in 30 days, after an audit revealed that the company was inadvertently virtualizing much of its infrastructure without the proper licensing. The organization brought on SHI, which eventually helped reduce the total cost owed by 90 percent, but this experience shows how ignorance of licensing can result in major costs.

Here are three common Oracle licensing challenges IT staffs are faced with, and three solutions that can alleviate those headaches and diminish the chances of an audit. Continue Reading…

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The ultimate guide to Microsoft SQL Server licensing

MazeMicrosoft’s grant program for SQL licensing expires on April 1, 2015. If you haven’t taken advantage of the grant’s offer of free per-core licensing, it’s time to determine if you’re eligible and act.

This offer and deadline are just one piece of a larger update to the way organizations license Microsoft SQL Server. While the new rules were enacted with the release of SQL Server 2012, many organizations are still trying to understand what these changes mean for them.

To help you better understand these agreements, we’ve written a primer explaining the main ways SQL is licensed, and the many other factors you have to consider when determining your licensing requirements. Continue Reading…

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Act now before you miss this Microsoft SQL licensing grant

hourglassIf you run Microsoft’s SQL Server, mark April 1, 2015 on your calendar – it could save your organization thousands of dollars.

That’s because April 1 is the deadline for Microsoft’s processor-to-core conversion grant. You might recall that Microsoft updated its licensing policies along with the release of SQL Server 2012. These rules changed the way servers were licensed, shifting from processor-based licensing to licensing the physical core. Now, in order to run SQL 2014, customers with an Enterprise Agreement (EA) must true up their per-core licensing, and doing so before April 1 will grant them blocks of free licenses.

As part of Microsoft’s extended grant incentive, customers that true up their licensing before April 1, 2015 will receive SQL per-core licensing grants for actual cores in use. Organizations that wait to complete this process until after April 1 will receive the minimum grant for only four cores per processor, leaving organizations to cover the rest. Continue Reading…

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What education customers must know about Adobe’s licensing changes

Adobe Creative CloudAdobe Creative Cloud burst onto the market in 2012 as an easy way for customers to keep Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and other applications up to date and accessible from anywhere. Over the last few years, subscription-based licensing has been the focus for many manufacturers, and Adobe has become an industry leader with more than 3 million Creative Cloud subscribers. In that time, Creative Cloud has replaced other licensing options for certain customers, and it’s about to become the exclusive source for the Creative Suite updates across all market segments.

Education customers should take note: On Feb. 28, 2015, Adobe will no longer offer Creative Suite 6 (CS6) through the Cumulative Licensing Program (CLP) or Transitional Licensing Program (TLP), with the expectation that customers will move to Creative Cloud.

CS6 was removed from commercial and government buying programs almost a year ago, compelling customers to purchase Adobe’s Creative Suite solely as an annual subscription through its Value Incentive Program (VIP). Adobe is now extending this change to education customers. Here’s what schools and universities need to know. Continue Reading…

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How Autodesk’s licensing change will affect you

ArtistComputerTabletThe subscription licensing model is here to stay, it appears. Microsoft and Adobe are two of the biggest recent examples of IT leaders moving toward subscription licensing, and now Autodesk has joined the fold. In order to simplify its offering and in recognition of the fact that most of its customers are on subscription, Autodesk has adjusted its software upgrade policy for certain licensed customers.

Starting Feb. 1, 2015, Autodesk will no longer offer its upgrade program for customers that own a perpetual license to a previous version of its software. Future editions of the company’s product suite will be available through the purchase of a new perpetual license for the current version, or as a Maintenance Subscription or Desktop Subscription benefit. All Autodesk products sold with perpetual licensing are covered by this policy change except for Creative Finishing products.

Who will the new policy affect? Continue Reading…

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Here’s what our readers considered a top IT priority in 2014

People around tableLooking back on 2014, it’s clear to us that IT asset management (ITAM), and more specifically software licensing, was a top priority for many organizations.

We published 93 posts in 2014, and eight of the 10 most-read articles explored various licensing changes from partners like Microsoft, Adobe, and Apple.

We’re not surprised. Software licensing is complicated, and the seemingly constant adjustments made during multi-year contracts make asset management that much more difficult. Because avoiding an audit is much more fun than responding to one, IT professionals must educate themselves on licensing changes, and how software licensing evolves over time.   Continue Reading…

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The 5 values that determine your product audit risk

In my first post in the calculating product audit risk (PAR) series, I discussed how organizations should have two different strategies for managing their overall software estate. For the set of products where the value to the business or the risk of non-compliance is high, we suggest a “manage the product” approach. For the rest of the software portfolio, we suggest a “manage the risk” approach. To help differentiate between these two segments of the overall estate, we introduced the PAR value.

As a reminder, here is the PAR formula:


In general, the PAR value is meant to quantify the relative financial risk a product represents within the overall software portfolio. But before you can complete the math, you need to know where to find the factors that go into the equation. Here’s how: Continue Reading…

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