What you need to know about SQL 2016 licensing

SQL licensing changesSQL 2016 was released on June 1 and licensing will remain mostly consistent for customers; however, there are a few changes that organizations must consider when purchasing or migrating to SQL 2016.

At a high level, there are three differences in licensing SQL 2016:

  • Reduction in SQL 2016 Edition options.
  • New license grant rules for migrating from SQL BI Servers to SQL Enterprise Servers.
  • A simplified virtual core licensing calculation to align with physical core models.

Compared to the SQL 2014 license models, this round of changes is less complex, but it will still have an impact on your organization. Let’s break down each of these adjustments and how to proceed. Continue Reading…

Tags: ,

The ultimate guide to Microsoft SQL Server licensing

MazeMicrosoft’s grant program for SQL licensing expires on April 1, 2015. If you haven’t taken advantage of the grant’s offer of free per-core licensing, it’s time to determine if you’re eligible and act.

This offer and deadline are just one piece of a larger update to the way organizations license Microsoft SQL Server. While the new rules were enacted with the release of SQL Server 2012, many organizations are still trying to understand what these changes mean for them.

To help you better understand these agreements, we’ve written a primer explaining the main ways SQL is licensed, and the many other factors you have to consider when determining your licensing requirements. Continue Reading…

Tags: , , ,

Act now before you miss this Microsoft SQL licensing grant

hourglassIf you run Microsoft’s SQL Server, mark April 1, 2015 on your calendar – it could save your organization thousands of dollars.

That’s because April 1 is the deadline for Microsoft’s processor-to-core conversion grant. You might recall that Microsoft updated its licensing policies along with the release of SQL Server 2012. These rules changed the way servers were licensed, shifting from processor-based licensing to licensing the physical core. Now, in order to run SQL 2014, customers with an Enterprise Agreement (EA) must true up their per-core licensing, and doing so before April 1 will grant them blocks of free licenses.

As part of Microsoft’s extended grant incentive, customers that true up their licensing before April 1, 2015 will receive SQL per-core licensing grants for actual cores in use. Organizations that wait to complete this process until after April 1 will receive the minimum grant for only four cores per processor, leaving organizations to cover the rest. Continue Reading…

Tags: , ,

How to prepare for the expiration of your EAP and ECI enrollments

Prepare for EAP and ECI ExpirationA year after Microsoft launched its Server and Cloud Enrollment (SCE) volume licensing program, many organizations are preparing to make the switch as their Enrollment for Application Platform (EAP) and Enrollment for Core Infrastructure (ECI) agreements expire. Customers with expiring contracts are facing critical decisions regarding the renewal of their software assurance (SA) into the SCE, which marks a major step in the simplification of Microsoft licensing programs.

The SCE allows organizations to consolidate ECI and EAP licenses into a single enrollment featuring standardized terms and discounts. Its broad product offerings include the Core Infrastructure Suite, SQL Server, BizTalk Server, SharePoint Server, Visual Studio with MSDN, and Azure.

EAP and ECI customers should closely evaluate the SCE option before enrolling in order to fully understand the changes and how their current licensing will shift under the new structure. Here’s what EAP and ECI customers must know and do to prepare for the SCE. Continue Reading…

Tags: , , , , ,