Resources, relationships, and results: How a children’s hospital fixed its disaster recovery plan

children's hospitalWhen faced with bad choices, it’s sometimes easier to just do nothing, even if that inaction can lead to a new round of issues.

Such was the situation for a children’s hospital in one U.S. city. The hospital had no disaster recovery (DR), and it was stuck with an impractical plan from a consultant – backup hardware in a building across the street. Continue Reading…

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You’re overdue for a data protection checkup

Stethoscope-on-KeyboardData is among the most valuable assets for any organization. And collecting, storing, and securing internal and external information only grows more important as the amount of data flooding in continues to rise.

Securing that data from hardware failure, natural disaster, malicious activity, or erroneous deletion can be challenging, especially if your data protection systems and processes aren’t functioning at their highest level. Given the speed with which data stores grow every day, it’s important to periodically audit and reassess your current data protection systems and determine whether an upgrade, refresh, or consolidation could better assist your organization in guarding your content.

Here are the four areas to review when evaluating your data protection solution. Continue Reading…

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What’s your disaster recovery plan? How to tell if the cloud is right for you.

Disaster recovery: the plan every business must have but hopes it will never need. While disaster recovery traditionally means a replication of data systems either on premises or outsourced to a secondary location, disaster recovery in the cloud has opened new, and often better, options for many companies. But the cloud also comes with several concerns that every business needs to take into consideration.

For any company thinking about cloud disaster recovery, here’s everything you need to know.

Cloud disaster recovery vs. on-site disaster recovery and secondary data centers

Before the cloud, businesses relied on on-site data centers or secondary data centers in remote locations for disaster recovery, and these systems still make sense for some companies today. But they often require an investment of tens of thousands of dollars. When disaster strikes, these systems offer peace of mind, but in the meantime, they can drain IT coffers as infrastructure, maintenance, and man-hours add up. Even secondary data centers, which take care of upgrades, repairs, and other needs, can cost upward of $50,000 initially, with additional ongoing infrastructure costs, even for a small company.

Unlike these traditional disaster recovery systems, cloud disaster recovery eliminates the costs of physical infrastructure and adds several other advantages. Currently there are two big players in the cloud infrastructure space: Microsoft’s Windows Azure and the leader in disaster recovery, Amazon Web Services (AWS). Today, I’m going to focus on the latter.

If you’re thinking of adopting cloud disaster recovery, and AWS in particular, here’s what you can expect: Continue Reading…

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